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Grief Counseling for Pets Moss Point MS

As we tend to the animals in our care, we will lose patients to death despite our best efforts. Often at these times, we are exposed to the emotions of the families who have loved them. For some, there are dramatic outbursts; for others, emotions will be put on hold for private moments.

Ernest Temple
(228) 769-2315
Pascagoula, MS
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified School Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Town & Country Veterinary Hospital
(228) 497-4295
4401 Gautier Vancleave Rd
Gautier, MS

Data Provided by:
Damien Thomas
(601) 900-2444
Brandon, MS
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Bryan Ballard
(228) 594-9010
Biloxi, MS
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Margaret McKnight
(901) 299-3877
Ashland, MS
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Aging/Gerontological, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Gerontological Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Escatawpa Animal Clinic
(228) 475-8881
7312 Hwy 613
Moss Pt, MS

Data Provided by:
Charissa Jones
(601) 818-4110
Hattiesburg, MS
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Pamela Stowers
(601) 977-9901
Jackson, MS
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Elliott Mathew Brown
(601) 426-7523
Laurel, MS
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Clinical Mental Health, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
Spanish, French, German

William Hubert Furr Jr
(601) 362-3583
Jackson, MS
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Data Provided by:

Respect and Accept: A Look at Grief With the Veterinary Client

Death and dying are uncomfortable subjects. For some, it stirs up painful memories of past losses. For others, it is a reminder of our mortality or the mortality of those we love.

As we tend to the animals in our care, we will lose patients to death despite our best efforts. Often at these times, we are exposed to the emotions of the families who have loved them. For some, there are dramatic outbursts; for others, emotions will be put on hold for private moments.

As different as people are, so are their reactions. No right or wrong. We must respect and accept the fact that we all grieve and express grief in our own way and in our own time, and we must be there to support our clients through this time.

Often, we’re uncomfortable with client reactions. No one likes seeing someone sad and crying, and we fumble, sometimes, in an attempt to make them feel better. Recognize, first of all, that it’s not possible to make them feel better at that time. With that in mind, there are some things you can do and some things that shouldn't be done during those times of client grief.
 
DO

Ø Find a place for quiet

Whatever the situation—a client rushing in with an injured pet or a pet dead on arrival, or an expected euthanasia—find a quiet place for the family. If a comfort room is not available, an exam room is the next best choice. If they need to fill out paperwork, take it with you as you escort them.

Copyright 2009 BowTie Inc.

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