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Veterinary Surgery Training Cordova TN

Indications for drain placement include reduction of dead space and prevention or reduction of fluid collection. This in turn decreases the risk of infection, since inflammatory fluid, necrotic tissues and blood are excellent culture media. Respecting some basic guidelines will help speed up the healing process.

Drennan Animal Hospital
(901) 305-8854
1890 N Germantown Pkwy Ste 103
Cordova, TN
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Daycare, Animal Flea Control, Animal Grooming, Animal Microchipping, Declawing, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Vaccinations

Tina Brown, MS, DVM, DACVD
(901) 624-9002
830 N Germantown Parkway
Cordova, TN
 
Cordova Animal Hospital
(901) 756-5977
7995 Fischer Steel Rd
Cordova, TN

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Angel Care Center for Animals
(901) 385-9172
6923 Stage Rd
Memphis, TN
 
Petvax Complete Care Ctr
(901) 373-9496
6963 Us Highway 70
Bartlett, TN

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Animal Care Hospital
(901) 466-6938
US HWY 64 and Terry Rd
Oakland, TN
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Daycare, Animal Flea Control, Animal Grooming, Animal Microchipping, Declawing, Equine Vet, Large Animal Vet, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary House Calls, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Vaccinations

Germantown Parkway Animal Hospital
(901) 757-5093
886 Cordova Station Ave
Cordova, TN

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Houston Levee Animal Hospital
(901) 755-0570
1144 Houston Levee Rd Ste 111
Cordova, TN

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Shelby Center Hospital For Animals
(901) 372-2215
6923 Stage Rd
Bartlett, TN

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Dixon, Traci, Dvm - Eads Animal Hospital
(901) 867-7387
3210 Cypress Ridge Dr
Eads, TN

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The Art of Draining Evil Humors

An active drain is placed on the ventrum of a 2-year-old male cat with a necrotic wound. (Courtesy of Dr. Zeltzman)
Drains are often used to help treatment of infected wounds, but they can also be very helpful after excision of large skin or subcutaneous masses. This is not a new idea; early surgeons, during the 19th century, thought of using glass tubes to drain infected wounds.
 
Indications for drain placement include reduction of dead space and prevention or reduction of fluid collection. This in turn decreases the risk of infection, since inflammatory fluid, necrotic tissues and blood are excellent culture media. Respecting some basic guidelines will help speed up the healing process.
 
There are two main types of drains: passive and active.
 
Passive latex drains are most often Penrose drains, although a sterile piece of IV tubing or a red rubber catheter can be used in a pinch. Fluids leak along the outer surface of the drain, so cutting fenestrations into it actually reduces its efficacy and makes the drain more likely to tear.

Passive drains rely on gravity and therefore must exit ventrally. Letting a drain exit through a dorsal incision defeats its purpose. Moreover, it creates a second opening through which bacteria can enter and cause an infection.

It is, however, a great idea to suture the drain dorsally to prevent its slippage, -usually in a blind fashion. The dorsal end of the drain can be held at the tip of a long pair of hemo...

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