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Pet Medications Bangor ME

At the Pet Poison Helpline, they have numerous veterinary professionals on staff, including board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialists, board-certified veterinary emergency critical care specialists, veterinarians and certified veterinary technicians specifically trained in the field of toxicology.

Veazie Veterinary Clinic
(877) 553-7088
1522 State St
Veazie, ME

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Bangor Veterinary Hospital
(207) 947-7103
1648 Broadway
Bangor, ME

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Brewer Veterinary Clinic
(207) 989-6531
111 Pierce Rd
Brewer, ME
Hours
Mon 07:00 AM-05:30 PM;Tue 07:00 AM-05:30 PM;Wed 07:00 AM-05:30 PM;Thu 07:00 AM-08:00 PM;Fri 07:00 AM

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Kindred Spirits Veterinary Svc
(207) 825-8989
857 River Rd
Orrington, ME

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Tomlalty, Christopher, Dvm - Ridge Runner Veterinary Svc
(207) 223-2596
559 S Main St
Winterport, ME

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Hoffman, Tori, Dvm - Bangor Veterinary Hospital
(207) 947-7103
1648 Broadway
Bangor, ME

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Eastern Maine Emergency Vetry
(207) 989-6267
15 Dirigo Dr
Brewer, ME

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Timberland Animal Hospital
(207) 827-7177
20 Stillwater Ave
Orono, ME

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Ridge Runner Veterinary Svc
(207) 223-2596
559 S Main St
Winterport, ME

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Bath Animal Hospital
(207) 358-4729
15 Congress Ave
Bath, ME
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Flea Control, Animal Microchipping, Declawing, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Medical Specialties, Veterinary Surgery

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Top 10 Human Medications Poisonous to Pets Revealed

Top 10 Human Medications Poisonous to Pets Revealed
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen top the list of human medications most poisonous to pets.
The Pet Poison Helpline offers tips for the prevention of pet poisoning caused by human medications. 

Justine A. Lee, DVM, DACVECC, associate director of veterinary services at the helpline, said as far as animal poisonings go, “they are unfortunately very, very common.” The 24-hour helpline is available throughout North America for veterinary professionals and pet owners who need help treating a potentially poisoned pet.

Tens of thousands of phone calls are fielded on human prescription drugs, rat poisons and environmental/home toxins, Lee said. Nearly half the calls involve over-the-counter and prescription medications for humans.

At the Pet Poison Helpline, they have numerous veterinary professionals on staff, including board-certified veterinary internal medicine specialists, board-certified veterinary emergency critical care specialists, veterinarians and certified veterinary technicians specifically trained in the field of toxicology. “We also have the added benefit of pharmacologists (PharmD) on staff; this multi-disciplinary approach is very important for us,” Lee said, as more than half the calls are about human drugs.

Below are the top 10 human medications most frequently ingested by pets.

  1. NSAIDs (e.g. Advil, Aleve and Motrin) Common household medications called non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) top the list. The names include ibuprofen (e.g., Advil and some types of Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve).
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  2. Acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol) Even though this drug is safe, this is not true for pets—especially cats. One regular strength tablet of acetaminophen may cause damage to a cat’s red blood cells.
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  3. Antidepressants (e.g. Effexor, Cymbalta, Prozac, Lexapro) While occasionally used in pets, overdoses can lead to serious neurological problems such as sedation, incoordination, tremors and seizures. Pets, especially cats, seem to enjoy the taste of Effexor and often eat the entire pill. One pill can cause serious poisoning.
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  4. ADD/ADHD medications (e.g. Concerta, Adderall, Ritalin) Minimal ingestions of these medications by pets can cause life-threatening tremors, seizures, elevated body temperatures and heart problems.
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  5. Benzodiazepines and sleep aids (e.g. Xanax, Klonopin, Ambien, Lunesta) About half of the dogs who ingest sleep aids become agitated instead of sedate. In addition, these drugs may cause severe lethargy, incoordination and slowed breathing in pets.
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  6. Birth control (e.g. estrogen, estradiol, progesterone) Large ingestions of estrogen and estradiol can cause bone marrow suppression, particularly in birds. Additionally, female pets that are intact are at an increased risk of side effects from estrogen poisoning.
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  7. ACE Inhibitors (e.g. Zestril, Altace) Pets ingesting small amounts of this medication can potentially be monitored at ...

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