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Veterinary Training Elizabethton TN

If veterinarians follow the pediatrician model, we need to inform the “parents” about their pet’s condition. Are physicians and veterinarians too blunt when they inform us with the statistical prognosis?

Brian Scott
(423) 926-3486
Johnson City, TN
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Kenneth Hughes
(423) 283-4958
Johnson City, TN
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

James Marshall
(423) 323-4243
Kingsport, TN
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified School Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Dawn Lacy Fritz
(423) 224-1300
Kingsport, TN
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Career Development, Clinical Mental Health, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Cherokee Hospital for Animals
(423) 218-1968
708 Cherokee Rd.
Johnson City, TN
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Daycare, Animal Flea Control, Animal Grooming, Animal Microchipping, Declawing, Holistic Veterinary Medicine, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Docking, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Medical Specialties, Veterinary Surgery

Joseph Johnston ll
(423) 943-5550
Johnson City, TN
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Julie Price
(423) 279-1222
Blountville, TN
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Sybil Smith
(423) 408-8041
Kingsport, TN
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Veterinary Medical Center
(423) 302-0998
205 Princeton Rd
Johnson City, TN
Promotion
Free Nail Trim with your visit when you mention this ad.
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday 7:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Daycare, Animal Flea Control, Animal Microchipping, Bird Vet, Declawing, Exotic Animal Vet, Holistic Veterinary Medicine, Reptile Vet, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Docking, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Medical Specialties, Veterinary Surgery

Pinecrest Veterinary Clinic
(423) 542-6091
1264 Milligan Hwy
Johnson City, TN

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Why is Deception So Common?

It has always bothered me when doctors and nurses blandly tell dying human patients that they will be “OK.” I am also bothered when I hear veterinarians and their support staff tell pet owners that their pet is going to be “all right” despite a poor prognosis looming overhead.

We may feel guilty if we take away a person’s hope, but should we lie about reality? Deception is all too common a habit in the human health care field, but should veterinarians also support the false hopes of their clients? Should frank lies come straight from health care professionals who encourage terminal patients to thrash in the gears of the “mindless machinery” of medicine? Is there harm in giving clients the truth about their pet’s actual condition and probable prognosis, at least as a reality check?

If veterinarians follow the pediatrician model, we need to inform the “parents” about their pet’s condition. Are physicians and veterinarians too blunt when they inform us with the statistical prognosis? Is there a more compassionate way to say, “You have six months to live”? How can this difficult information be gently delivered to the family without ripping their hearts out and stomping on their hope?

Deception is commonplace in the human and pet food and supplements industry. We know that 38 percent of the labels in the supplement and nutraceutical industry are not what they claim to be.

In a 2008 University of Chicago medical ethics survey of human oncologists, 73 percent said progno...

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