Subscribe to VETERINARY PRACTICE NEWS   SUBSCRIBER SERVICES   
VPN Logo   
 Home   About Us   Contact Us
 

Veterinary Training Laramie WY

If veterinarians follow the pediatrician model, we need to inform the “parents” about their pet’s condition. Are physicians and veterinarians too blunt when they inform us with the statistical prognosis?

Tanaya Morris
(877) 721-0700
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Andrea Berry
(307) 742-6222
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Counselor Education, Aging/Gerontological, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Glenna Hansen
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Aging/Gerontological, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Karen Harden
(307) 721-0700
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Career Development, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Michelle Worden
(307) 742-9390
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Brenda Cannon
(307) 851-9736
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Clinical Mental Health, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Ms. Andrea (andi) Berry
(307) 461-9905
Pendley and Associates1277 N 15th St
Laramie, WY
Specialties
Chronic Pain or Illness, Loss or Grief, Life Coaching
Qualification
School: University of Oklahoma
Year of Graduation: 2003
Years In Practice: 5 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Average Cost
$130 - $130
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: APS Healthcare

Karen E Robertson
(307) 288-0955
Counseling & Consulting: Karen Robertson, PC1050 North 3rd Street
Laramie, WY
Specialties
Loss or Grief, Relationship Issues, Domestic Abuse, Mood Disorders
Qualification
School: University of Wyoming
Year of Graduation: 1986
Years In Practice: 20+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any, Pacific Islander
Gender: All
Age: Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$120 - $200
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Judith Coburn
(307) 745-8335
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Aging/Gerontological, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Michelle Worden
(307) 742-9390
Laramie, WY
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Disaster Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Why is Deception So Common?

It has always bothered me when doctors and nurses blandly tell dying human patients that they will be “OK.” I am also bothered when I hear veterinarians and their support staff tell pet owners that their pet is going to be “all right” despite a poor prognosis looming overhead.

We may feel guilty if we take away a person’s hope, but should we lie about reality? Deception is all too common a habit in the human health care field, but should veterinarians also support the false hopes of their clients? Should frank lies come straight from health care professionals who encourage terminal patients to thrash in the gears of the “mindless machinery” of medicine? Is there harm in giving clients the truth about their pet’s actual condition and probable prognosis, at least as a reality check?

If veterinarians follow the pediatrician model, we need to inform the “parents” about their pet’s condition. Are physicians and veterinarians too blunt when they inform us with the statistical prognosis? Is there a more compassionate way to say, “You have six months to live”? How can this difficult information be gently delivered to the family without ripping their hearts out and stomping on their hope?

Deception is commonplace in the human and pet food and supplements industry. We know that 38 percent of the labels in the supplement and nutraceutical industry are not what they claim to be.

In a 2008 University of Chicago medical ethics survey of human oncologists, 73 percent said progno...

Copyright 2009 BowTie Inc.

Click here to read the rest of this article from Veterinary Practice News